Protecting traditional knowledge through biodiversity conservation

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Tradition is something that needs to be created, not simply protected. If we are to protect anything, it is nature itself, which supports tradition.

Morimoto Kiko, an artist and master in painting Kimonos from Kyoto, established an eco-cultural enterprise in Chot Sam, Cambodia in the mid 1990s. Jointly with women weavers he is bringing back lost skills through revitalising traditional knowledge and practices. His work is also related to biodiversity conservation. Morimoto and the local community are planting a traditional forest where everything from the natural dyes to the silk can be harvested in the rich natural environment. Learn more about the Institute for Khmer Traditional Textiles and the underlying philosophy around linking nature with tradition, craftsmanship, and collaboration here.

Watch a short clip on Morimoto’s work here.

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